White Knight Chronicles International Edition
Categories

White Knight Chronicles International Edition

White Knight Chronicles International Edition

  • On the internet multiplayer communication functions such as voice chat, live speak allowing characters to have side conversations, camera functionality through Crystal Camera and the on the internet GeoNet portal.
  • Devastating transformation abilities allowing players to change into the giant White Knight, gaining the capacity to challenge big enemies, as nicely as troops of soldiers throughout the adventure.
  • An accessible turn-based combat system permitting the player to control and optimize the attacks and abilities of a 4 character quest, such as a totally customizable avatar character.
  • 50+ exclusive disc based on the internet side quests permitting you to quest cooperatively with up to 3 other players to gain extra gear and experience. Further quests will be available in the future.
  • Georama lobby creation functionality permitting the constructing of a persistent online village usable as an multiplayer game lobby, or as a location for other people to check out and/or marketplace for in-game items.

White Knight Chronicles is an epic fantasy tale about two kingdoms in midst of a longstanding war. The King of Balandor, wishing to put an end to the war, invites the duke of Faria to his castle to celebrate his daughter’s coming of age. But this cel

List Price: $ 29.99

Cost: $ 21.50

3 Responses to “White Knight Chronicles International Edition”

  • Steve Burdette "Console agnostic gaming enthu...:
    90 of 99 people found the following review helpful:
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    My Experience with White Knight Chronicles, March 10, 2010
    Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
    This review is from: White Knight Chronicles International Edition (Video Game)

    Customer Video Review Length:: 9:39 Mins

    My original video was 12 minutes long so there are a few awkward edits to get it down to 10, but this should give you a good idea of what to expect with this game.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  • T. Edwards "Dorothy Mantooth is a Saint!":
    59 of 70 people found the following review helpful:
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Pretty average solo, great online, February 5, 2010
    By 
    Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
    This review is from: White Knight Chronicles International Edition (Video Game)

    Graphics-
    It’s no surprise by looking at numerous videos and screen-captures of this game that it’s a far cry from cutting edge. The overall technical level of the graphics is either showing its age or they took a hit by having such expansive and large set pieces and characters. That isn’t to say they’re awful though. Each individual looking at this game will likely have to evaluate what they demand in terms of graphics from a game. I personally would call them passable because while they aren’t astonishing the locations of the game are interesting to look at and the enemies and characters you’ll meet are appropriate to their settings and fun. Character and attack animations while mostly understated still manage to be engaging and entertaining with spells being the most impressive of the bunch.

    Sound-
    The music thus far has been strictly average. At times I feel as though I have a pack of bards tailing me because the majority of the songs I’ve heard having that kind of simple village music sound to them, flutes with little boisterous drive to get the blood boiling. The voice overs aren’t too bad, none of the characters are particularly irritating in cut scenes or battles but the timing does suffer from the typical Japanese to English dub syncing issues. Overall I’d say everything works on a functional level but it does little inspire the player like a very good score sometimes can.

    Combat-
    Battles play out with a bit of a blend between turn based RPG standards with a touch of MMORPG. Before battles you can set up action bars by placing acquired skills in to slots. During a fight you will have a circular timer count up and when full you can select an action from your preselected set to use. At the very start of the game it seems painfully slow due to few options for skills and the likelihood that you don’t fully understand how the system works. As you get more attacks, build combos, and balance your load-out to your liking though it becomes much more enjoyable. One could for example play a mage with little to no armor wielding a dagger and they’d get turns much faster than a heavily armored melee fighter but the obvious trade off is that they become a bit of a glass cannon by trading defense for speed. I think there’s a lot of not so obvious depth to the combat which makes it rather enjoyable for me. Granted it isn’t a system everybody will enjoy and criticisms against it I feel have been fair from reading other reviews.

    Enemies-
    The enemies themselves seem to come in two flavors, big and small. Small enemies are pretty much what you would expect, find what hurts them and hurt them with it. Collect your spoils, wash, rinse, repeat. The bigger enemies however are much more fun to fight and offer more nuanced ways of defeating them. Early on you’ll be fighting trolls for example. Trolls have 4 targetable zones, their 2 legs, the belly, and their head. You can defeat the enemy just by hitting it anywhere, it doesn’t really matter, but you can grant you and your party opportunities by exploiting the enemy’s weakness. In the case of a troll for example you can shoot out their legs to prevent them from attacking briefly all the while granting your party an increased chance to hit by way of lowering the troll’s evasion. Another option in the single player mode is using the namesake White Knight to put the fight a little more in to proportion but still fundamentally the same. There’s a lot of variety in this sense though. You’ll encounter a limited number of archetypes for the bigger enemies but exploring these alternative and tactical ways of defeating them is both fun and rewarding as I believe attacking certain body parts can yield certain drops a la Monster Hunter (speculation).

    Skills and Character Progression-
    Leveling is pretty typical for the most part, kill a bunch of stuff and complete quests to accrue enough experience to advance a level. Upon leveling up in addition to a base increase to various stats you are awarded 4 skill points. These points can be used in several different specialties to grant abilities and stat bonuses to your character. Each individual specialty has 50 things to buy so with 8 trees you’re looking at 400 possible purchases, of which I’d say about 80% are skills the remaining 20% being stat bonuses (guestimates). Needless to say that’s a pretty adequate repertoire to choose from. Individual characters may more or less select from any set but certain story characters are locked out of certain sets. Your self created “avatar” is open to choose from them all though. From what I’ve read, but I can neither confirm or deny at this juncture, is that your created character is also given a chance for a re-specialization (or respec as we nerds call it) at level 50 and following the completion of the story mode. This respec supposedly bumps you back to level 35, refunds all of…

    Read more

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  • Peter J. Thomas:
    10 of 10 people found the following review helpful:
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    White Knight Chronicles, Int’l Edition – Level 5, April 19, 2010
    By 
    Peter J. Thomas (Pittsburg, PA USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
    This review is from: White Knight Chronicles International Edition (Video Game)

    This game was sort of a fluke buy. I watched the trailers, and I was really all for it, but as the reviews started coming out, I started becoming more and more skeptical. This is not like me, because I’m the last person who will base my purchase of a game on a review (does that make me a hypocrite for reviewing games for others?).

    Anyways, WKC is your typical ‘save the princess’ storyline. You’ve got your heroes, allies, enemies, etc. If you’re a gamer, you’re familiar with all of these aspects, so I’m not going to delve into them too much. There are a few things that stand out in this game, both positively and negatively, which I will emphasize on.

    First, your senses. This game is auditorially (made up word?) a very appealing game. All of the music is very fitting, and really gives you a good feel of where you’re at, what’s going on, and so on. I didn’t really pay attention to who composed the music, but they definitely deserve some credit for coming up with an epic track. There are many different instruments used in each song, and if this game had an OST, I would recommend all game music listeners to purchase it. It definitely completes the project, that’s for sure. One thing I noticed about it too is that none of it seems repetitive. In fact, you almost don’t notice it’s there unless you try hard enough to listen. That’s just how good it is.

    Also, the graphics in this game are beyond breathtaking. Granted, I played the majority of this game on my 19″ 1080i Asus monitor, but still. Sometimes it really blows me away just how much the PS3 can do. The environments are expansive, the towns seem alive (similar to FFXII), and you really have to sometimes just drop the camera low to suck in all of the surroundings. I feel if you don’t take in some of the sights (and use the Crystal Camera) then you are not truly experiencing this game.

    The third was the battle system, and the primary reason this game lost a lot of points with me. You are able to free roam the environment, and pick and choose your battles as you see fit. This was great, because nowadays, I don’t have time to wait as I get into a battle of a traditional RPG anymore, go through the battle, then item and experience distribution, then back to the field, only to get into another battle three steps later. Action RPG’s have slowly grown on me over the years, and I have a feeling it’ll be like that for a while. However, the way the system is set up feels clunky. Original, but clunky.

    You set your attacks up based on the weapon you are carrying. For example, the basic attack of a shortsword is slash. If you change your weapon, and forget to change your attack tray, then you are stuck with no attacks. When you engage an enemy, a ring pops up with the name of the attack you’re currently ready to use. When the ring fills, you can press X to initiate the attack, and the ring empties for it to be filled again. This ring fill speed is based on the equipment you have on your player. If you wear clunky, heavy armor, the ring fills anywhere from 6-8 seconds. If you wear light knit armor (or roll nude, which I needed to do a few times), the ring can fill as fast as 1.5 to 2 seconds. So in a sense, you still feel like you’re trapped within a traditional RPG waiting for your ATB gauge to fill or something, and it’s ugly on the screen. I understand their concern for making a button masher, but I can think of a few different ways this could have been handled. Then again, I’m not a game programmer, so who am I to say?

    One of the biggest complaints that I saw in most reviews was the lip syncing and yes I agree, it is really badly done. The storyline is pretty cheesy as well, so it only adds to it. The one saving grace that it does have is that come midway through the story, it stops being cheesy and becomes much more drama filled, giving you much information about the characters you’re with, their backgrounds, and why they are where they are. It does get good if you can bear with it, even to the point you almost forget how bad the voice acting is.

    The game is relatively simple, and if you didn’t horse around like I did, you can get through it in a few short hours. There is a few things to do outside of the main game, such as going on line and playing with peers (which is a lot of fun) or messing around with your Georama, but the game is pretty cut and dry. All of the trophies are hidden though, so be prepared to do a lot of playing to figure out what they are.

    Overall, I don’t regret buying the game, I just think there were some issues they could have (and should have) worked on before a release. I am just hoping WKC2 will address these issues. Oh, and the ending is totally worth playing through the game, if nothing more.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

Leave a Reply

Archives